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When it comes to having your cup of coffee, there are endless ways you can have it or customize it. Some people like hot coffee, other people like iced coffee, some even prefer it frozen, like a frappuccino. Whether you are looking to spice up your coffee or just curious about ways you can make it more interesting, below you will find three tips on how you can change it up. 

Butter & Coconut Oil

A lot of you reading this might be thinking “why would I put either of those ingredients into my coffee?” To start things off, this unlikely pair is actually really popular among the paleo dieters and health conscious. By adding grass-fed butter and coconut oil into your cup of hot coffee, you are essentially making your coffee healthier. The grass-fed butter and coconut oil will help your body boost energy and increase metabolism, resulting in fat loss. Butter also provides omega-3 and omega-6 vitamins that both boost brain functionality.

Cinnamon 

Adding cinnamon to your coffee is actually really common among individuals across the globe. Not only does cinnamon add a kick of flavor to your coffee, but it is also known to decrease blood sugar levels in individuals. Oh, and the best part, you can add it to any type of coffee, whether you like it hot, iced, or frozen. 

Maple Syrup

If you find yourself with a sweet tooth, then perhaps you can mix some maple syrup into a nice cup of coffee. By adding maple syrup into your coffee, you will be adding a smooth natural sweetness that isn’t too overpowering. 

Enjoy Your Coffee

As mentioned before, there are virtually limitless ways in which you can customize your coffee. There is no right or wrong way. The main thing you want to remember is that your coffee is supposed to bring you joy, so add whatever your heart desires and you are bound to create the best coffee that you will be able to tell all your friends and family about. Enjoy!

At first thought, you might not think that there is anything better than a nice warm or iced cup of coffee. But after today, you’re going to realize that your cup of coffee is actually missing something, and you definitely don’t want to miss out on what that “something” is. So if you happen to be a coffee connoisseur as well as a dessert fanatic, then buckle in! Today, you will read about 5 desserts that will go great with your coffee as well as get their recipes!

 

Raspberry Cream Cheese Coffee Cake

Just the name itself is sure to make your mouth water. If made correctly, this cake will make you stop going to the bakery and cooking this up every time you want something sweet. The moist and butteriness paired along with the sweet cream cheese filling, juicy raspberries, and crunchy streusel pieces are paired perfectly on their own. Add some coffee on the side of this beautiful cake and you are bound to find bliss right away. And just in case you are wondering, there is no coffee in the ingredients of this cake, it is merely meant to be served nice and warm alongside your coffee. 

Find the recipe here.

 

Chocolate-Dipped Sesame Cookies

Let’s be honest with each other, anything dipped in chocolate is simply amazing. You can even buy chocolate-dipped espresso beans at certain stores! These chocolate-dipped sesame cookies are going to pair perfectly with your cup of coffee. Both toasted and black sesame seeds will play with each other and create an amazing texture and warm nutty taste. Then dip half the cookie in some chocolate, let it cool, and you will have a cookie that you just wouldn’t be able to resist. 

Find the recipe here. 

 

Chocolate Coconut Meringue Pie

Did you read that right? Yes, you did. This meringue pie is made with the amazing combination of milk chocolate and coconut and topped with the cloudy texture of espresso flavored Italian meringue. If this doesn’t sound like pure heaven with some coffee, then you probably just don’t like pie at all. 

Find the recipe here. 

 

Cinnamon & Sour Cherry Scroll Cake with Crunchy Coffee Glaze

This amazing cake is absolutely meant to be eaten with some coffee. The soft warm cinnamon cake with the tart cherry filling carefully glazed over with a crunchy coffee glaze is one of the best desserts you will ever make or encounter in your lifetime. It is something that you will be able to enjoy at any time of the day. 

Find the recipe here.

 

Homemade Cannoli 

Last definitely not least, is the homemade cannoli. If you don’t have “eat a cannoli with with a cup of coffee” on your bucket list, now is the time to put it in the list. This recipe will show you how to make a light and crispy cannoli shell while also showing you how to make the amazing filling that will bring all of the flavors and textures together. 

Find the recipe here.

 

   

 

Coffee should be one of the world’s greatest wonders, considering how loved it is across the globe. Coffee drives people, and without it, the world wouldn’t be the same. In fact, coffee is so coveted that in bigger cities, you can’t even go around the corner without seeing some sort of coffee shop. But there is more to coffee than just using it to get that extra kick you need to get through the day. Coffee grounds have a variety of uses once you’ve used them for your cup o’ Joe.

For The Pet Parents:

Your pets aren’t just pets, they are part of your family. That means you should take care of them like family! Coffee grounds repel fleas and can even treat a pet’s flea infestation. The next time you are giving your fur-child a bath, dump the harsh chemicals that come with flea shampoos, and instead, grab some of your used coffee grounds and gently scrub the grounds through your pet’s fur after shampooing. Rinse it out and allow your pet to dry as usual. 

Get Rid of that Smelly Smell

No one has ever walked into a coffee shop and claimed it smelled bad. The reason your local coffee shop always smells like heaven is that coffee grounds contain nitrogen, which when combined with carbon, eliminates any foul-smelling gasses that may be lingering in the air. In simpler terms, coffee grounds absorb and eliminate odors. 

To get rid of any odors in your fridge or freezer, you can fill a bowl with your used coffee grounds and just let it sit in there and do its job. And if you would like to use coffee grounds to take away any other odors (gym bags, shoes, your car, or bedrooms), then simply fill up any extra socks or pantyhose you may have laying around, and simply place them wherever you would like to eliminate any odors.

Stop Eating Tough Meat

All meats contain muscle fibers and proteins that can give it a tough texture. That’s why a lot of people tenderize the meat they are going to cook before they throw it on the skillet. Your used coffee grounds contain natural acids and enzymes that will ultimately break down any fibers or proteins that are resulting in tougher meat. Also, the nature of the coffee grounds will add some extra flavor to whatever you are cooking!

In order to do this, go ahead and add used coffee grounds to your favorite dry-rub recipe and make sure to apply it to the meat at least two hours before cooking, so it may have time to break down those tough fibers.  

 

For The Plant Parents

As any plant parent knows, soil is one of the most important aspects of having a fresh garden. Many soils don’t have the key ingredients to keep your plants nourished and full of life. Coffee grounds, on the other hand, contain several key minerals that are important for keeping your garden flourishing. In fact, coffee grounds contain nitrogen, calcium, potassium, iron, phosphorus, magnesium and chromium! Coffee grounds also attract worms, which can be great for your garden?

Grab your used coffee grounds, and sprinkle them around your plants. That’s all there is to it!

Get Rid Of Scratches on Your Wood Furniture

Anyone that has ever owned wooden furniture knows that it can be scratched pretty easily. While there are a few products that you can get from the local home improvement store, you might want to give your coffee grounds a chance first. Coffee grounds have been known to minimize the appearance of scratches on wooden surfaces. 

To do this, simply mix some of your used coffee grounds into a bit of water in order to get a thick consistency. Rub the paste into any scratched surface with a cotton swab and allow to sit between 5-10 minutes. Then simply wipe it off and see the amazing results!

Is there anything coffee grounds can’t do? 

At this point you are probably thinking that coffee can do just about anything, and to be honest, you are probably right. So the next time you drink some coffee and feel on top of the world, don’t forget to see how you can use those used up coffee grounds.

Most people around the world can’t get to their offices without their morning cup of coffee. It is the perfect stimulant to supercharge your brain for a long day of work. In the U.S. alone, the beverage is downed by about two-thirds of American adults daily

However, did you know that your morning cup of Joe also has some excellent health benefits? Here’s a list of reasons why you should view the drink as an important part of your routine to remain healthy and active.

Protects From Alzheimer's Disease and Dementia

Alzheimer’s disease is one of the problems that comes with age, and this is one of main causes of dementia for people above the age of 65. Ongoing research has one interesting finding: Drinking coffee everyday can reduce the risk of people developing Alzheimer’s disease. A healthy lifestyle with proper diet and exercise will go a long way in preventing the onset of Alzheimer’s disease, but adding coffee to that list is an easy way to boost your efforts.

Source of Antioxidants

Scientific studies in recent years have zoomed in on the role of antioxidants on a wide variety of health issues, including diabetes, heart and liver diseases, cancer and premature death. Fruits and vegetables are known to be rich in antioxidants and so an ideal diet would include eating huge quantities of these two food groups. However, you might want to add coffee to that, as some researchers have found it to be one of the best sources of antioxidants in the Western diet.

If you’re torn between a hot and a cold brew, go for the warm cup of coffee. A 2018 study found that hot coffee has more antioxidants than cold coffee. 

Lowered Risk of Type 2 Diabetes

When insulin in the body is unable to counter high blood sugar levels, it leads to type 2 diabetes. Diet changes and weight loss can possibly reverse the condition, but studies have also shown that drinking coffee might prevent it. One study, in particular, cites that the risk of type 2 diabetes, as well as high blood pressure, may be reduced by drinking up to four cups of coffee every day.

Burns Fat

A recent study by the researchers at the University of Nottingham found that coffee literally burns fat, specifically brown adipose tissue or BAT. According to the research, drinking coffee stimulates BAT, which in turn makes the body become more efficient at converting white adipose tissue (WAT), the body’s energy reserves. Too much of WAT stored in the body makes people look fat. 

Lowers the Risk of Certain Cancers

The World Cancer Report 2020, which is released roughly every five years by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) and considered to be the authoritative source of all things cancer-related, states that recent research have suggested drinking coffee may reduce the risk of liver and endometrial cancer. The IARC cites a study which found that consuming three cups of coffee daily lowered the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma, the most common type of primary liver cancer, by 27%. Although the IARC acknowledges the relationship between the two is unclear, it’s still worth noting.

Texans love their coffee, but everyone likes their morning cup differently. When it comes to brewing at home, some like to use drip coffee makers while others turn to the French press. Between the two, which method makes the best morning cup of Joe? Let’s find out.

French Press

A simple machine with a glass container and a removable plunger top, the French press steeps coffee grounds in a container before the plunger slowly presses the brew for a bolder and full-bodied cup of coffee.

Advantages

Disadvantages

Drip Coffee Maker

Drip coffee makers are common in many households. It’s a very convenient way of brewing coffee—just set it and forget it. However, the taste depends on the ground quality, and you have less control over your brew. 

Advantages

Disadvantages

French Press vs. Drip Coffee Maker: The Final Verdict

French press offers a richer taste but requires more time, while the drip coffee maker provides a quick caffeine fix. Which method is best depends on your taste, preferences and even life values. Do you need convenience or do you aspire for quality? You might even find that you need or like them both—that’s cool too.

To the average coffee drinker, “cold brew” and “iced coffee” might sound synonymous, but coffee experts know they’re very different. Read on to find out in what ways cold brew varies from iced coffee.

Cold Brew vs. Iced Coffee: How Are They Different?

The primary distinction between cold brew and iced coffee is in the way they’re made. Basically, iced coffee, much like regular coffee, uses hot water to release the caffeine content. Meanwhile, cold brew mixes ground coffee with water at room temperature and the mixture is then allowed to sit for at least 12 hours, essentially using time to extract the caffeine without using heat.

Due to their different brewing methods, iced coffee and cold brew have distinctive tastes. While iced coffee’s flavor might be reminiscent of regular coffee that’s toned down a bit and with bitter undertones, cold brew provides a smoother coffee flavor with hints of natural chocolate.

Cold Brew vs. Iced Coffee: How are the Brewing Techniques Different?

Although both cold brew and iced coffee might use the same coffee grounds, their brewing methods are far from identical. Iced coffee is made with hot water (at around 200 degrees Fahrenheit or 93 degrees Celsius); the mixture is then cooled down and poured over ice.

Cold brew, on the other hand, takes much more time to produce. If iced coffee uses heat to extract caffeine content and flavor, cold brew uses time. Brewed with room-temperature water (it’s never heated during the brewing process), you’ll need 12 to 24 hours to create cold brew, but it will be worth it as the resulting beverage will have more caffeine, and be less bitter and more flavorful.

Cold Brew vs. Iced Coffee: How Different Do They Taste?

Speaking of flavor, iced coffee—as you might expect—tastes like watered down coffee. It also has a thinner taste due to the melting ice which dilutes the coffee concoction. Because it’s brewed hot, iced coffee extracts more coffee solubles, and their accompanying organic materials, which also result in a more bitter flavor.

On the other hand, cold brew, like Eximius’ Cappio Cold Brew Coffee, has a smoother texture and a more chocolatey tones than traditional coffee.

Cold Brew vs. Iced Coffee: Which is Better?

For people with certain health issues, like gastroesophageal reflux disease, or GERD, cold brew might be more beneficial than iced coffee. For the rest of us, the answer to the question of which is the better coffee—cold brew or iced coffee—all boils down to individual taste and preference.

Whether you’re just trying out cold brew or you’re already a regular cold brew drinker, Eximius Coffee offers a great option—its Cappio Cold Brew Coffee! Available as ground coffee in filter packs or as a concentrate in 16-oz. bottles, Cappio Cold Brew Coffee can be easily prepared at home. Made from 100% Arabica coffee that’s gently steeped for 12–24 hours in triple-filtered waters, it’s the perfect aromatic pick-me-up and can be consumed hot or cold.

Millions of people worldwide rely on coffee to jump-start their day. In fact, the dark beverage is so popular that the estimated consumption is around 2 billion cups daily. But, how did coffee become so famous? What are the legends surrounding its origin? What is the history of coffee? Learn more about the deep history of coffee and how it became the most enjoyed and celebrated beverage in the world.

A Coffee Legend

Legend has it that a goat herder named Kaldi from Ethiopia first discovered coffee’s stimulating properties. He observed that his goats were filled with energy at night after eating the berries of the coffee tree.

Some accounts say he shared this discovery with the local abbot, while others state that the monk witnessed the strange behavior of the herder and his goats and took back some fruits to the monastery. Either way, the berries helped them stay alert through their long prayers.

Modern Coffee’s Beginnings

The popularity of the drink spread far and wide, but the modern version of roasted coffee first appeared in Arabia in the 13th century. Two hundred years later, coffee was being grown in the Arabian Peninsula.

It then spread to the neighboring countries of Egypt, Turkey, Syria and Persia in the 16th century, where it was being consumed in Gahveh Khanehs (public coffeehouses) that sprung up in many cities in the Near East. These coffeehouses became a social hub and an important center for the exchange of information.

Coffee in Europe and the New World

By the 17th century, coffee had spread to Europe. Many coffeehouses were established in France, Holland, Germany, Austria and England, and there where more than 300 were in London alone. People continued gathering in these public spaces to share a drink and exchange ideas.

Coffee was then brought to the New World in the mid-1600s in New Amsterdam (New York), although tea remained the favorite for a long time. However after the Boston Tea Party in 1773 when the Sons of Liberty dumped the British tea in protest, drinking coffee became a patriotic duty.

Coffee in the Americas

Coffee eventually made its way to the Americas when the young naval officer Grabriel de Clieu was tasked to transport a seedling to Martinique in 1723. He succeeded despite many challenges which included harsh weather, pirate attacks and even a saboteur. The young coffee plant, a gift from the Mayor of Amsterdam to King Louis XIV of France in 1714, became the parent of all coffee trees in the Caribbean, South and Central America.

A few years later, another Frenchman, Francisco de Mello Palheta, would bring coffee seeds to Brazil, giving rise to its famous eponymous coffee and a billion-dollar industry.

Eximius’ Role in Coffee Today

Similar to coffee’s journey, Eximius also has a long history. From its European roots—it was established in Spain in the 1920s—Eximius founder Carlos de Aldecoa Fernandez moved the business to the fertile lands of Veracruz Mexico in the early 1930s.

It then expanded to the U.S. under the leadership of the founder’s son, Carlos de Aldecoa Pereda. Eximius has been operating from Houston, Texas, since 1985.

Millions of people worldwide rely on coffee to jump-start their day. In fact, the dark beverage is so popular that the estimated consumption is around 2 billion cups daily.

But, how did coffee become so famous? What are the legends surrounding its origin? What is the history of coffee?

A Coffee Legend

Legend has it that a goat herder named Kaldi from Ethiopia first discovered coffee’s stimulating properties. He observed that his goats were filled with energy at night after eating the berries of the coffee tree.

Some accounts say he shared this discovery with the local abbot, while others state that the monk witnessed the strange behavior of the herder and his goats and took back some fruits to the monastery. Either way, the berries helped them stay alert through their long prayers.

Modern Coffee’s Beginnings

The popularity of the drink spread far and wide, but the modern version of roasted coffee first appeared in Arabia in the 13th century. Two hundred years later, coffee was being grown in the Arabian Peninsula.

It then spread to the neighboring countries of Egypt, Turkey, Syria and Persia in the 16th century, where it was being consumed in Gahveh Khanehs (public coffeehouses) that sprung up in many cities in the Near East. These coffeehouses became a social hub and an important center for the exchange of information.

Coffee in Europe and the New World

By the 17th century, coffee had spread to Europe. Many coffeehouses were established in France, Holland, Germany, Austria and England, and there where more than 300 were in London alone. People continued gathering in these public spaces to share a drink and exchange ideas.

Coffee was then brought to the New World in the mid-1600s in New Amsterdam (New York), although tea remained the favorite for a long time. However after the Boston Tea Party in 1773 when the Sons of Liberty dumped the British tea in protest, drinking coffee became a patriotic duty.

Coffee in the Americas

Coffee eventually made its way to the Americas when the young naval officer Grabriel de Clieu was tasked to transport a seedling to Martinique in 1723. He succeeded despite many challenges which included harsh weather, pirate attacks and even a saboteur. The young coffee plant, a gift from the Mayor of Amsterdam to King Louis XIV of France in 1714, became the parent of all coffee trees in the Caribbean, South and Central America.

A few years later, another Frenchman, Francisco de Mello Palheta, would bring coffee seeds to Brazil, giving rise to its famous eponymous coffee and a billion-dollar industry.

Eximius’ Role in Coffee Today

Similar to coffee’s journey, Eximius also has a long history. From its European roots—it was established in Spain in the 1920s—Eximius founder Carlos de Aldecoa Fernandez moved the business to the fertile lands of Veracruz Mexico in the early 1930s.

It then expanded to the U.S. under the leadership of the founder’s son, Carlos de Aldecoa Pereda. Eximius has been operating from Houston, Texas, since 1985.

With the rich experience of three generations running the business, Eximius has been serving coffee with a passion while establishing itself as an expert in the industry.

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